Mademoiselle LaParisienne

This is a compilation of posts that usually relates to museum artifacts, garments, and other works of art from eras gone by, or posted on whim.

tiny-librarian:

Get to Known me Meme, Royalist Edition

[7/7] Royal Kids - Sophie Helene Beatrice

Little Sophie lay in her cradle, fighting for breath, her weak lungs failing. Antoinette kept watch beside her, in tears over her “poor little angel.” heartbroken and powerless to save the tiny child who was growing more feeble by the day. On June 15 Sophie became dramatically worse, and four days later she was dead. Antoinette shut herself away at Trianon with Louis and her sister-in-law Elisabeth. “Come,” the Queen wrote to Elisabeth, “we shall weep over the death of my poor little angel…I have need of your heart to console mine.”

thenextfamous:

coltonwestdance:

adayofballet:

Svetlana Zakharova in Two as One

The breath

I needed this……

thenextfamous:

coltonwestdance:

adayofballet:

Svetlana Zakharova in Two as One

The breath

I needed this……

(via vaganovaboy)

fannyrosie:

Working rainy Friday outfit. It was so humid that I had to wear a hat.

(via cimetiere-chanson)

vivelareine:


The day when we bade good-bye to our nurses, we also bade good-bye to childish things, and were handed over to tutors and governesses to be moulded into the most approved patterns of deportment. We were supposed never to question anything, but merely to become clever automata …
It was always the same; we were not educated, for ourselves, but merely to live in the eyes of the world; our young lives were sacrificed to position, and we were not supposed to possess any individuality or display any emotion.

—Archduchess Louise of Austria, ‘My Own Story.’
[image: Louise of Austria dressed as Marie Antoinette, via Internet Archive Book Images]

vivelareine:

The day when we bade good-bye to our nurses, we also bade good-bye to childish things, and were handed over to tutors and governesses to be moulded into the most approved patterns of deportment. We were supposed never to question anything, but merely to become clever automata …

It was always the same; we were not educated, for ourselves, but merely to live in the eyes of the world; our young lives were sacrificed to position, and we were not supposed to possess any individuality or display any emotion.

—Archduchess Louise of Austria, ‘My Own Story.’

[image: Louise of Austria dressed as Marie Antoinette, via Internet Archive Book Images]

fashionsfromhistory:

Robe a la Transformation

c.1864

French

MET

(via cimetiere-chanson)

(Source: bobbyfraser, via xbroadwayrosex)

(Source: frankenchris, via poupeefroid)

vivelareine:




Detail from Portrait of a Lady by Rose-Adélaïde Ducreux. 18th century.
[source: Sotheby’s Auctions]

vivelareine:

Detail from Portrait of a Lady by Rose-Adélaïde Ducreux. 18th century.

[source: Sotheby’s Auctions]

ryanishka:

pointetillyoudrop:

vaganovaboy:

prosthetic-dance:

The Bolshoi Ballet in The Pharaoh’s Daughter featuring Svetlana Zakharova

I LOVE THIS BALLET and these photos are stunning <3

I wish this ballet was more commonly done so I could see it live :(

I’VE NEVER SEEN A LOT OF THESE

(via jete-like-marianelanunez)

operafantomet:

How I’d envision Christine Daaé’s personal wardrobe to look, with a basis in actual historical fashion (but from the mid 1870s). 

For some reason I see her in really smart dresses. One would think that with her background (poor peasant family from Sweden) and with her upbringing (living at the mercy of others, as an orphan) she’d dress in plain, modest clothes. That might be most correct. At the other hand, Maman Valerius seems to have liked to spoil Christine when she could, and being in the fashionable world of singers and dancers she would have learned to dress smart. 

A lady of the late 19th century would change clothes several times a day. The upper class ladies had one attire for breakfast (often an elaborate dressing gown), one for sports if they enjoyed riding, tennis or similar, one for day visits and/or walking, one for tea/midday, one for afternoon supper, and one for balls or opera visits. In extreme cases you could end up changing clothes 6-7 times a day - of course with matching hairdos, jewelry and accessories. THIS is why you needed a maid or three! 

Christine would not be on this level. But she would at least have dressing gowns, day dresses and evening dresses. Most of the ones showed here are various day dresses, as that’s what I imagine she’s use the most. Christine would not afford garments from House of Worth, as many of these dresses are, but she would be familiar with the style, and maybe the costume makers at the opera found this Swedish flower so charming they made her garments? 

I see Christine in a lot of blue, mint and pigeon blue shades. I don’t know why. Probably influenced by the iconic Wishing dress, designed by Maria Bjørnson. I’m also seeing beige/tan shades. 

Historical references is typical for the 1870s. The crinoline was just gone, all width pushed towards the back to form a bustle. This is inspired by the early 18th century style “Mantua”. But the invention of sewing machines meant seamstresses went nuts with pleats, drapes, fringes, trims and advanced constructions. 

1. Walking dress, 1870s. I found no reference on this on the site it originated. Possibly American? ( X )

2. Day dress, ca. 1875. Another one with no info attached ( X )

3. Afternoon dress, ca. 1875, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston ( X )

4. and 5. Dinner dresses, ca. 1872-75. Two slightly different versions of a dress designed by Worth. They have different bodices, and at least the mint one had an additional bodice so it could be worn as a ball dress as well. The blue one once had a detachable train for very formal occasions, alas it’s gone. (blue dress and mint dress)

6. Visit dress, March 1875, L’Élegance Parisienne ( X )

7. 
Silk day dress with embroidery, ca. 1875. National Trust Collections in the UK. ( X )

8. Walking dress, August 1875, L’Élegance Parisienne ( X )

(via hisvoicefilledmyspirit)