Mademoiselle LaParisienne

This is a compilation of posts that usually relates to museum artifacts, garments, and other works of art from eras gone by, or posted on whim.

jeannepompadour:

"The utility of cork rumps" fashion satire caricature, published in London, 1777

jeannepompadour:

"The utility of cork rumps" fashion satire caricature, published in London, 1777

(Source: lochiels, via lochiels)

jeannepompadour:

Posthumous satue of Gertrude of Hohenzollern (c. 1225-1281), Queen of Germany, second half of 16th century 

jeannepompadour:

Posthumous satue of Gertrude of Hohenzollern (c. 1225-1281), Queen of Germany, second half of 16th century 

jeannepompadour:

Portrait of Lady Anne Hamilton by James Lonsdale, 1815

jeannepompadour:

Portrait of Lady Anne Hamilton by James Lonsdale, 1815

micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola 

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.

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(via nickspratt)


"The moment when my ills are going to end is not the moment when courage is going to fail me."

thegetty:

On October 16, 1793, the 38-year-old Marie-Antoinette met her end. An Austrian archduchess who became queen of France while still a teenager, she was subjected to a two-day mock trial and found guilty of conspiring with foreign powers against the French Republic.

It was widely believed that the queen had brought about the kingdom’s financial ruin in a time of economic crisis. Exhibit A: the Petit Trianon, a private country estate on the grounds of Versailles filled with glittering furniture and other decorative objets, which was cited as an example of her extravagance and debauchery.

“It is possible that the Petit Trianon cost immense sums,” she admitted to the Tribunal, “perhaps more than I would have wished. Little by little we were led into undertaking more expenses.”

More about these objects on The Getty Iris: Three Reasons to Love Marie-Antoinette

Queen Marie-Antoinette, about 1789, Pierre-Michel Alix after Elisabeth-Louise Vigée Le Brun. Courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington

Side Chair, 1780–81, Jacques Gondoin, designer; frames by François-Toussaint Foliot; carved by Toussaint Foliot. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Wall Light, 1781, model by Claude-Jean Pitoin, designer; casting and chasing attributed to Louis-Gabriel Feloix, metalworker. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Chair, about 1787, frame by Georges Jacob; carved by Pierre-Claude Triquet and Jean-Baptiste-Simon Rode. The J. Paul Getty Museum


Marie-Antoinette in the mirror of her dressing table. From The French Revolution in Paris: Seen Through the Collections of the Carnavalet Museum, Jean Tulard and Marie-Hélène Parinaud, Paris-Musées, 1989.

The execution of Marie Antoinette from the french comic “Marie Antoinette, Reine de France (1755-1793) de l’or à pourpre”